Resume Writing Services

Resume writing is critical in controlling the image you present to employers. The stronger the skill and experience descriptions are in your resume--the higher the number of interviews and salary offers you will receive.

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Cover Letter

A Resume cover letter is a one-page document that is designed to introduce and explain submitted material such as a job application. Drafting a cover letter is challenging work, as it must cleanly and elegantly sell the accompanying material along with its author. Some people seek professional help when assembling a cover letter...

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Resume Distribution

Resume distribution helps to recruiters and employers may well improve your chances of getting a new position. In this day and age, employment agencies and recruiters are the quickest and most comfortable means for finding a job and improve your chances of getting a new position.

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  • What is a Cover Letter?

    A Resume cover letter is a one-page document that is designed to introduce and explain submitted material such as a job application. Drafting a cover letter is challenging work, as it must cleanly and elegantly sell the accompanying material along with its author. Some people seek professional help when assembling a cover letter, to ensure that it is effective and persuasive. While a cover letter may be the last piece of an application, it is one of the most important elements of the finished whole, since it gets the author in the door.

    How to write a Cover Letter?

    You could redact the best resume in the world and be highly the person indicated for the job, but if your cover letter is poorly written, generic, or misguided, you can pretty much throw your chances out the window. The cover letter is your first, and sometimes your only chance to obtain an employer's attention and let them know why your resume is worth reading.

    How to write a cover letter You should remember that the cover letter is the single most important document of your job search. It's the document that will get you an interview and an audience for your writing sample, and it's the document to which the committee will return after you have interviewed. A letter written precipitately is unlikely to get attention, and since it's time-consuming to apply for jobs, don't bother unless you're prepared to spend some time on your cover letter. Start to work on this letter during the summer before you begin your job search. It can easily take various months to write, and you will need to pass it along to people many times before it's complete.

    It should be laid out in a businesslike format as follows:

    Paragraph one:"Introduction".

    Comment the job you're applying for and where you found it advertised. Since your curriculum vitae will offer information about your degree (where and when), dissertation director, fellowships, prizes and so on, you don't need to mention them in your letter. Doing so takes up valuable space in the letter and, more importantly, marks you as a graduate student. Try to sound like a professional, someone who has already put graduate school behind you. The selection committee will look at your vitae and see all these details in a more readable format. The same goes for areas of specialization.

    Paragraph two:"Dissertation".

    Don't spend your time with the director's name; it's in the vitae. So is the list of publications that came out of the dissertation. Don't use the letter to recapitulate anything that's in the vitae, except the title of the dissertation. This paragraph is critical. Try to convey the main idea of your project, the originality of your work, the writers you cover, and the approach you take. One nice detail of a chapter will give readers something to hold onto. You may also address future research in this or a later paragraph.

    Paragraph three: "Teaching experience and philosophy".

    Exhibit your philosophy, maybe a brief example of how you put it to work, and special courses you would like to teach.

    Paragraph four: "Final paragraph".

    Tell what you have enclosed, whether a dossier is on its way, how the school should get one if it needs one, whether you will be available at MLA (which you should). Don't spend too much time thanking them.